Tag Archives: ‘development’

WordCamp Boston: Basics, jQuery, HTML5, Security, Legal Issues, and Cluetrain at Ten

This past January, WordCamp Boston took place at the Microsoft NERD Center, offering multiple tracks of sessions and speakers for WordPress devotees in the Boston area. Recently, we published some of the sessions from this WordCamp on WordPress.tv—if you missed it, here’s a recap of what’s available.

From the Developer/Designer Track

The Developer and Designer track from WordCamp Boston starts out with some basics and moves into heavier territory. First, there’s Mitcho with “Getting into the Loop,” an introduction to how to work with The Loop and make it work for your WordPress sites. Then, Daniel Jalkut from Red Sweater Software discusses the AtomPub and XML-RPC APIs in “Exercising APIs,” using examples such as desktop, iPhone, and even Web implementations.

Jim Doran gives an overview and a case study in how to use “jQuery in WordPress,” demonstrating layout and animation techniques, DOM manipulation, and JSON, Daniel Collis-Puro shows you how to have “Screaming Fast WPMU” with a whole bunch of optimization techniques and tricks to get your installation up and running smoothly, and Rob Larsen teaches the basics of integrating “HTML5” enhancements into your themes using some JavaScript and a little know-how.

Rounding out the Developer and Designer track, we have Daisy Olsen’s session on “Parent and Child Themes,” demonstrating how to get more mileage out of themes by creating new versions of them as child themes, and “Making BuddyPress Do Thy Bidding” from Boone Gorges, beginning with basic BuddyPress examples and moving on to more specialized fare.

From the Practical Track

The Practical Track contains sessions like “Rock Your Business Blog” from Karen Rubin, focusing on building a brand and an audience using your business blog, “WordPress, PHP, and CSS: Oh, My!” from Shayne Sanderson, covering the very basics of theme development and design to help your blog get off the ground without the need for specialized design work, and “MU-ving to MU” from Automattician Jane Wells, explaining and detailing the changes coming to WordPress MU in WordPress 3.0, as it joins the main WordPress distribution.

WordPress security has been a hot topic lately, and Brad Williams gives his excellent presentation entitled “Lock It Up,” where you can learn several basics to help keep your WordPress site secure. Corey Eulas performs a live critique of sites owned by audience members in his presentation, “SEO Analysis.”

A good overview of legal issues faced by bloggers as they work to create good content is presented in “How Not to Get Sued” by Miguel Danielson and Kimberly Isbell, giving you insight into what you should consider before you hit Publish. And Steve Garfield gives a lightning version of his web video course in “Get Seen: Web Video,” offering tips on everything from equipment to post-production techniques.

The Keynote

In a great sit-down discussion, two of the original authors of The Cluetrain Manifesto discuss its impact, its foresight, and its shortcomings ten years later in “Ten Years after the Manifesto: The Cluetrain Stops at WordCamp.” Doc Searls and David Weinberger sit down with writer Scott Kirsner to discuss the lasting impact and lessons to take from Cluetrain in its second decade.

That’s a lot of video to digest, so dig in, kick back, and enjoy the sessions from WordCamp Boston. Summer brings WordCamps, and WordCamps bring more session video. Be on the lookout for more sessions posted to WordPress.tv! Follow us on Twitter for notices when we publish the latest videos.

Weekly Recap: Inspirageek’s Interview with Matt Mullenweg and WordPress 2.9

A happy holidays to you from WordPress.tv!

We published two videos for you this week—one an interview with Matt Mullenweg of Automattic, and the other a video introduction to the neat stuff included in the latest release of WordPress.

Josh Grenon of Inspirageek interviews Matt Mullenweg in our first video published this week. They discuss some general tips for entrepreneurs, the development process for (the now released) WordPress 2.9, some basics behind VideoPress and why it’s great, and a few other odds and ends.

This weekend also saw the release of WordPress 2.9, the latest and greatest edition of our favorite software. To herald this event, our very own Michael Pick has composed an introductory video to WordPress 2.9, hitting the major updates and changes you’ll be playing with in the weeks to come. It’s a quick watch—check it out and feel free to embed when you talk about WordPress 2.9 on your own blog.

With the Christmas and New Year’s holidays coming up in the next two weeks, I expect new videos here on WordPress.tv will be few and far between, but we’ll still be here to check out and publish videos you direct us to using our handy contact form.

All of us here at WordPress.tv wish you a very happy holiday season and look forward to more great WordPress videos in 2010!

WordPress.tv: the shape of things to come, blow-by-blow

Making WordPress.tv – the future, now

We’ve just switched on Making WordPress.tv, a development blog with real-time updates on what’s cooking at WordPress.tv labs. It makes use of the freshly launched P2 theme, which you can use yourself on your WordPress.com blog (coming to a self-hosted blog near you, soon).

So what’s the idea with having a WordPress.tv dev blog?

For one, to give you at-a-glance, real time updates of what’s being made, features under consideration, and content underway.We’re big fans of transparency, and this is really an experiment into how making the process of putting out a stream of bite-sized development updates in public might make for an all round better experience for everyone.

But the idea goes a bit deeper than that. In sharing the process, ideas on what could be better, and the day-to-day running of things, we’re inviting you to have your say, share your ideas, and help shape the way WordPress.tv evolves over time. We’re still only just getting warmed up, and for major signposts you’ll be able to check in here in the WordPress.tv blog. But if you want to get a bit more up close and personal, or are just interested in what goes on behind the scenes, Making WordPress.tv is there for you.

Things you’ve been telling us= the future of WordPress.tv

We’ve had some excellent feedback from you, and encourage you to share more of it – through the content form up there in the menu, or directly on the WordPress.tv dev blog as it unfolds. Some of the things you’ve been asking about include:

  • Making it easier to experience WordPress.tv in your language
  • Being able to subscribe to content in your RSS reader or podcatcher app (read Miro or iTunes)
  • Being able to download content for the sake of portability

We made our first step towards making WordPress.tv a global community by adding language filtering recently. I wrote about it yesterday. This is, of course, a small step, and we’re starting to receive lots of ideas about what we could do to push things further in this direction for the international WordPress community. I’m looking forward to seeing how that unfolds.

As for being able to subscribe to feeds of your favorite categories, or a global feed – and by extension of that, download content – these are features that aren’t too far away. We’re fans of being able to take your media with you, whichever way you choose to access it – and I personally can’t wait to be able to subscribe to WordPress.tv feeds in, say, Miro or iTunes. Stay tuned.

WordPress.tv needs you

As always, we’re keen to hear your ideas, to share your videos, and to make WordPress.tv easier and more enjoyable for you to use. Every video you submit is reviewed, every idea logged, and every email responded to. If you experience differently, let us know – we’re all ears.

As always, your comments are welcome here, and of course on the new dev blog.

WordPress.tv – in your language

WordPress has a lot of users who don’t speak English as a first language, or at all. Thanks to the work of volunteers and the hard-working localization teams, experiencing WordPress in your language is easier than ever, whatever it might be.

But what about WordPress.tv?

Well, at the moment a lot of the content you’ll find here is in English. However, we’re keen to make it as easy as possible for people to add their own content, in their own language. Hopefully, in time, it’ll also be possible to translate some of the content you’ll find here to help fellow users out.

While we work towards a solution for making it easy to localize our content, you’ve started adding your own, which is awesome. 

And to make it easier, you can now filter the content on WordPress.tv by language. When you head to the How-To or WordCampTV sections of the site, you’ll now find the option to filter the content you see by language.

Ok, right now there’s a lot of English language content, and a handful of Spanish and Italian videos – thanks to the contributions of WordPress users like you. But we hope that in time this will grow to encompass as many languages as WordPress itself does. 

Remember, if you’d like to submit a video to be shared on WordPress.tv, you can do that from the contact form up in the menu. We’re looking forward to seeing them.

What other things could we be doing to make experiencing WordPress.tv in your language easier?

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 557 other followers